J-Pop

extralarge   Princess Princess

J-Pop. AKA: Japanese pop music is another interest of mine that just won’t die. There’s something about these magical singing/dancing pixie people that enthralls me. The first time I was exposed to J-pop was my second day living in-country. I turned on the radio and searched for the military network, I heard Kenny Rogers’ “The Gambler” and immediately turned it off. I sat there for a moment, pissed at realization that my days of being entertained by the radio were probably on hold for the next three years. I flipped it back on and decided to see what type of nonsense was being broadcast over the local airwaves….

What I found intrigued me. I stumbled upon what must have been some type of in-studio concert. Two Japanese men were talking back and forth for a few moments then all went silent and a guitar was heard. The intro consisted of some pretty elaborate and speedy fingerpicking, I waited for the first verse to begin, and I waited, and waited, and waited…. It seemed like 10 minutes before the song actually started. But that couldn’t be right. Could it? Finally, an older sounding man in a raspy voice began to sing. In fact he began to croon the same line over and over again. To my young American ears, it sounded like he saying “English! Didi-la-la Didi-la-la”. Who knows what he was really saying, but he went on repeating this for nearly another 10 minutes, over and over and over. I turned of the radio and silently wondered what I getting myself into.

That was the extent of my interest in Japanese music until maybe a year later. As part of a culture exchange program, we had a teenage Japanese girl stay with my family over the Christmas holiday. She was a very nice girl and she happened to bring a tape with her of an all-girl Japanese rock band “Princess Princess”. A quick listen revealed that this was MUCH DIFFERENT from “Didi-la-la
“. She made a copy for me and I listened to it often. Despite not being able to understand the lyrics, I found the recording to be one of my favorites. I kept the tape for many years until finally it simply wore out and broke sometime in the mid-90s.

After returning to the states, the years went by and I became involved in the whole 90’s Alternative scene. It wasn’t until many years later, after I got married, that my love for J-Pop was rekindled. I had taken a hiatus from video games for most of the mid to late 90’s. After marrying and settling down a bit, my wife and I bought a brand new PlayStation 2. One of the first games we purchased was Kingdom Hearts. This game was a strange blend of both Disney characters and icons from the Final Fantasy universe. It featured a theme sung by the J-pop idol Hikaru Utada. I found the song to be quite catchy and thanks to the Internet I got my hands on some of her other works.

utada-hikaru   Hikaru Utada

Fast forward a few more years, I find myself living in Tennessee working the graveyard shift for a bank. I discover a streaming J-pop station on the Internet called J-Fan Radio. This station opens my ears to even more Japanese artists. I fall in love with idols or bands with names like:  Tommy February6, Dragon Ash, Balzac, Ayumi Hamasaki, Koda Kumi, and Gackt.

In recent years, Japanese culture has entered the American mainstream thru video games and various Anime. With them has come many original soundtracks featuring J-pop. Due to this, it’s very easy these days to get your hands on the latest music from our friends in Japan. If you’ve never experienced it, I recommend giving a listen. They make great soundtracks to late-night video game marathons. I take a bit of pride in being able to say “J-pop? Oh yeah, I was listening to that 20 years ago.” But honestly, I didn’t learn to appreciate it until many years later.

004392w9   Gackt

 

Gilgamesh’s Tavern

**UPDATE**
Due to my general dissatisfaction with the game, I cancelled the podcast several months after the initial launch.***

As mentioned in a previous post, I’ve been a lifelong fan of the Wizardry franchise. In fact, writing that post had me pining for the glory days of Wizardry again. So much so, that I began researching the upcoming Wizardry Online game rather heavily. I must say, I’m very impressed with what I’m seeing. My love for Japan has been established on this site, so it’s certainly no secret. So has my love for the fantasy genre and dungeon-crawling type of adventures. The old Wizardry games were rooted very much in the classic Dungeons & Dragons vein of “fantasy gaming”. Which is perhaps why I found them so appealing.

As time went on and Wizardry declined in popularity, Final Fantasy seemed to fill both of these slots. Japanese style art direction, with a swords and sorcery element.I was hooked. Over time, Final Fantasy evolved into it’s own genre. I’d call it high-fantasy. While I still love the series, it’s easy to say that it is no longer rooted in the classic “knights and dragons” western ideal of fantasy gaming. In short, there is little to no Dungeons and Dragons left in Final Fantasy.

The Japanese takeover of Wizardry, has not followed on Square-Enix’s heels however. If anything, the Japanese developers of Wizardry are very careful to stay true to the origins that inspired the original Wizardry games, and from what I’ve seen, this has carried over to Wizardry Online.

This excitement has lead me to undertake a new project. I’d like to announce the beginning of both my first-ever podcast, and the first English language Wizardry Online podcast: Gilgamesh’s Tavern.

The first episode is already available on iTunes, with new episodes coming bi-weekly. I felt that, being a first-time podcaster, I needed something big to give myself a little credibility. Therefor, I sought out one of the original creators of Wizardry, Robert Woodhead and conducted a 30 minute interview about the origins of the game, and his thoughts and memories of Wizardry over the years.

I hope that over time, as Wizardry Online is released and grows in popularity, my podcast becomes one of the first place Wiz Online fans turn for news and community.

Links to the show in iTunes are provided below:

 

With that being said, now that the podcast project has been launched, I will again be able to update this blog with much for frequency and begin building a nice site for those you out there that share my passions.

Final Fantasy

If Wizardry is considered the grandfather of western-style fantasy games. Than Final Fantasy is its far-eastern cousin. While Wizardry was rooted in classic Tolkien style swords and sorcery, Final Fantasy can be summed up as a more unfamiliar techno-fantasy type of genre. I was introduced to the series while living in Japan. I had noticed the game in the collection of several of my Japanese friends, and I knew that it was off limits. “No play!” They would tell me. I assume they feared I would accidentally delete their character data due to my inability to read the Japanese menus. I enjoyed watching them play the child-like characters, as they explored weird underwater shrines, and did battle with goblins or vampires.

Eventually, the game was translated to English and made available to the western audience. I snapped it up immediately and never looked back. The summer of my post 6th grade year was spent exploring the game to the fullest. I created characters of every class, snooped through every nook and cranny of every dungeon, and defeated the final monster countless times.

I knew that Final Fantasy II and III were already available to my Japanese friends, and I was more than upset to learn that Nintendo of America intended to skip these tiles and repackage the upcoming Final Fantasy IV and “Final Fantasy II” for the American audience.

Over the years, I consumed every Final Fantasy title made available to me.  Eventually, after I was married and had children of my own, the elusive third entry in series was finally brought to the American shores in the form of a 3D remake.

To date, I have played and beaten every single-player entry in the series (except for the newly released XIII-2). As far as the online titles go, I was active in Final Fantasy XI from 2003 until the spring of 2011. I have been a supporter of Final Fantasy XIV ever since.

While Wizardry, nurtures the purest part of my dungeon crawling, spell casting, classing D&D spirit, Final Fantasy appeals of me in other ways. The art direction reminds me of my years living in Japan, while the settings and in-depth stories cater to the classic fantasy elements that make Wizardry so appealing.

A few years ago, I thought it might be interesting to play through various game franchises and post reviews of each game, noting how they have matured and developed over time. I did this with the Final Fantasy series.

In the coming months, I’ll be posting these reviews.

Wizardry

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One fateful summer night in 1989, my friend James suggested we play a computer game on his dad’s old black and white Macintosh. After a few rounds of Chess, I spotted an interesting looking icon in the games folder. “Oh no. That’s Wizardry.” He said. “It’s not very good. It’s too hard.”

Despite his protests, I kept bugging him and eventually he relented. What I discovered was mysterious labyrinth filled dangerous monsters at every turn, trapped treasure chests, and cryptic messages scrawled on the walls of the dungeon. I was enamored.

“Hurry! Cast a healing spell!” I screamed as a band of Kobolds nearly killed the Fighter leading our party.

“I don’t know which spell will cure! They are all written in Latin or something!” He cried.

Moments later, the entire party was defeated.

“Oh no! My dad is going to kill me. This was his group, and I’m not supposed to play it. He’ll be so mad!” James exclaimed…

There as only one thing to do to save James from what was sure to be a WHOLE WEEKEND of lawn mowing and car washing. We had to sbring them back to life. To accomplish that, we needed to create new characters. Their mission: return the corpses of dad’s fallen party to the city where they could be resurrected.

It was truly a slumber party of epic proportions.

The game was Wizardry, and at the time it was the most fantastic thing I had ever played. It was the first game that really opened my eyes to world of swords and sorcery. If it wasn’t for Wizardry, I would have probably never taken an interest in other fantasy role playing games, or even tabletop games like Dungeons & Dragons. In Wizardry, you create and control a party of six characters. Their mission is travel to the bottom of a ten-level maze to recover a magical amulet stolen by a powerful wizard. There is no in-game map, so it’s wise to chart every step you take on graph paper. If you don’t, eventually, you WILL get lost.

It was another year or so before I was able to get my hands on a copy of Wizardry for the Nintendo. The NES version was an upgrade of sorts, the maze was colored a muddy orange, and there was actually music that played in town and on the title screen. It was thanks to this port of the original classic, I was finally able to complete my quest to recover the amulet.

The sequel was also ported to the NES. I purchased it and loved it just as much.

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I knew that three more games existed in the series, but until the release of Wizardry V for the Super Nintendo, I was left out of the loop (my parents did not own a personal computer at the time).

Eventually, the information age hit my household and with the purchase of an IBM compatible PC by my mother, I saved my allowance and ran to the software store at the local mall. Sadly, it seems time had passed by the older Wizardry titles, but the latest entry; Wizardry VI -Bane of the Cosmic Forge, sat shrink-wrapped on the shelf ready for me to take home. Even though it was now over a year old, this title was still a hot seller.

This was first title in a new direction for the Wizardry series. Released in 1990, the game features detailed graphics and outdoor environments. Bane was actually that start of a three game trilogy that wouldn’t come to a conclusion until 2001, with the release of Wizardry 8.

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Bane of the Cosmic Forge

wizardry8-2   Wizardry 8

Around the time that Wizardry 8 was released, people’s interest was sparked enough that a compilation was released of the first seven titles. The Ultimate Wizardry Archives. Finally, I was able to sit down and play the first five games in order. It was delightful to watch the games progress in quality from title to title. Another satisfying feature of the PC versions was the ability to import your characters from previous chapter.

I was surprised by the lack of information on the Internet available for wizardry at the time, so I decided to create my own Wizardry fanpage. From 2001 to 2003, Kyler’s Wizardry Den was the largest source of Wizardry information on the net. I can boastfully say that my contributions to the Wizardry community live on this day. Even though my website is no more, the exclusive maps that I created can still be found floating around the web. At one point, I even boldly elaborated on the original background plot for Wizardry I, adding some colorful commentary and ideas to the scant three-line background found in the original manual. Before going bankrupt, Sir-Tech soft included my rendition of the Wizardry story on their website, officially making my ideas canon. I was honored.

Since the release of Wizardry 8, and the bankruptcy of the founding company, things here in the west have been quiet. Many young gamers have never even heard of the series. This, however, is not true for Japan.

Once Wizardry was released on the NES, the Japanese audience went wild. The first 7 games were made available on the Famicom, Super Famicom, and Sony Playstation (Japan only of course). At some point, a Japanese publisher bought the rights to the franchise and number of Japanese-exclusive games were made for handheld systems. To date, most of these Wizardry: Gaiden and Wizardy Empire titles have yet to see release in the US.

One exception was the release of Wizardry: Tales of the Forsaken Land. This title, known as Busin: Wizardry Alternative in Japan, was released on the PS2 shortly after the release of Wiz 8 here in the US. It is highly recommended, if you can find a copy. I have to admit, the Japanese “get it”. They understand what Wizardry is really about. If I may be so bold as to suggest, this title makes a better sequel to Wizardry V than Bane does. It seems to be more of a natural progression. Sadly, it’s sequel has not seen a release here.

Wiz 6, 7, and 8 have more of a PC RPG feel to them that an actual “Wizardry” feel. The Japanese titles, seem to stay very true to the roots of the originals.

Tales, was the our last taste of the Japanese Wizardry series until the recent release of Wizardy: Labyrinth of Lost Souls on the Playstation Network.

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I am in love with this title. Again, it seems to be a natural progression of the original Wizardry series. All of the original quiet, but hardcore elements are there. Yes, the Japanese have certainly put their own spin on the art direction of the series. But, being a fan of Japanese art and culture, you will not hear any complaints from me.

I’m taking my time with this title, not wanted to finish it too fast because the next chapter in the history of Wizardry is about to manifest here in the US with the release of Wizardry Online.

Imagine, an MMO that features permanent character death, friendly fire, and always on pvp. The mere idea of it is an instant turn off for most western players. In games these days, if you die, no big deal. Just run out to your body in spirit form and resurrect with little to no penalty. Not with Wiz Online. No sir.

Just thinking about it, I am reminded of that night in ’89. Crawling through the uncharted dungeon trying to find to bodies of the characters Jame’s dad created…

I can’t wait to relive that magic moment again.

Japan

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If you’ve actually read this blog, you’ll know that as a child I was a military brat. Shortly after starting my 4th grade year, my family moved to Okinawa, Japan.

Living in Japan was one of the most defining experiences of my life. I still remember exiting the quiet, climate controlled airplane after a 22 hour flight. Stepping thru the archway of the plane and into the Okinawan air for the first time was like a slap in the face. The air was thick and moist. It was just like a steamy sauna, only with the smell of salt water and foreign foliage in the air. The jet lag had really got ahold of me, and I found myself unable to sleep in the hotel room that day. I flipped on the TV only to find three channels. One English speaking channel operated by the US government and two local Japanese channels. Watching Japanese television for the first time was a wake up call like I’ve never had. The cheesy samurai soap opera, followed by a children’s show featuring an octopus farting into a Jello mold made on thing abundantly clear; I was in a completely different world.

3772349310_7b9de77e47 A bottle of Sake featuring the corpse of a venomous Habu snake in the bottle

Living on military base in a foreign country can be a bit deceiving. Inside the confines of those walls, you could almost believe you never left the normalcy of the USA. But step outside, and there’s no question… You are in Japan. One of the first things I learned to enjoy about Okinawa, was the food. Thankfully, I love noodles, and there no short supply of them. Over my three-year stay in Japan, I became quite fond of the various flavors the orient had to offer. It’s an obsession that lasts to this day.

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The first time you taste something like Miso, or some other foreign spice or sauce, it can be a little off-putting. But once you break thru the defensive concept of “I’m not used to this”, you might just surprise yourself! There’s often a whole world of good food out there that you may never experience.

One thing I will say about these Japanese, they certainly like their candy. Japanese snacks and confectioneries are like no other. The variety of flavors seems endless. For example, over here in the US, we have three flavors of Kit Kats. Chocolate, Dark Chocolate, and White Chocolate. In Japan, on the shelf of any random convenience store, you might find Kit Kats in such exotic flavors as: Wasabi, Orange, Banana, Cheese, Sweet Potato, Basked Potato, Key Lime, Green Tea, etc.

In the short three years I lived there, I was never able to get a firm grasp on the Japanese language.  But I did have many encounters with kids my age. One thing that we both understood, regardless of our language barrier was video games. The Nintendo Entertainment System, or as it was called in the Japan, the Famicom was in just as many Japanese households. Many of our games were the same. Things like Mario and Zelda didn’t rely heavily on words, so there was no real need to to be concerned with communication. It was not uncommon for a Japanese friends to lend me a Famicom game to take home and play. However, the size of the carts were different. This led to a compatibility problem. Thanks to the black market, this problems was easily solved for a mere $10. Meet the honeybee.

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This beautiful piece of Asian engineering made is possible to fit a Famicom game into a standard US NES. Oh, the fun times that were had thanks to this little devil. I may have never learned the secret that the REAL Super Mario Bros. 2 was not the same as the SMB 2 that was presented to the American audience… but I’ll save that rant for another time.

I slowly became absorbed with Japanese pop culture. I viewed Dragon Ball Z cartoons on TV during their first run, I saw video games months before they were even revealed to the western audience. I read manga, collected anime branded pencils, listened to Japanese pop music. There’s so much I could write about when it comes to my experiences in Okinawa. Perhaps I will do so in future posts. For now, let this serve an introduction into my obsession with a particular genre of video game, the Japanese RPG.

The Nintendo Era

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The world of gaming changed forever in October of 1985. The date that the Nintendo Entertainment System was released in North America.

I still remember getting mine. It was Christmas morning, at my grandmother’s house. I tore the paper from the corner and my eyes caught sight of the golden Nintendo Seal. I knew immediately what it was before the rest of the paper was even off the box. I had stared at the NES boxes on the shelf at Toys R Us long enough that even that little peek of what lie underneath the paper gave it away.

The NES came with a copy of Super Mario Bros. but I also received a copy of Metroid that year. I don’t recall cracking it open until later tho. I clearly remember sitting in front of the TV for the next two days playing Mario almost non-stop. It was snowing outside and much too cold to go out and play (thankfully), so I had a convenient excuse.

As time went on, my game collection grew and grew. I had most of the classic titles:

SMB, Kid Icarus, Zelda, Mike Tyson’s Punchout, Mega Man, Contra, Castlevania, Final Fantasy, Double Dragon, Skate or Die…  You name it. And what I didn’t own, I rented from the video store.

At one point, I subscribed to the official Nintendo magazine: The Nintendo Fun Club Newsletter.

The first issue I received featured the newly released Mike Tyson’s Punchout. The next issue was the intro for The Legend of Zelda II: The Adventure of Link. The following one featured some hockey game, I don’t recall which. There were no further issues of the newsletter, because that next month, it was changed into the magazine we all know and love: Nintendo Power.

The first issue of Nintendo Power was a real jaw-dropper. They premiered the upcoming Super Mario Bros. 2.

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I was a total fanboy, as were most of my fellow third-grade classmates. Not only did we collect games, but we had various controllers, the NES MAX, the NES Advantage… years later I was even the owner of the notorious Power Glove.

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Nintendo has had many competitors since the NES debuted in the 80s. I think it’s fair to say that as time has gone by, Nintendo has lost a bit of their audience. They seem to focus now on more casual and family gaming. Perhaps this will change with the release of the new console the Wii U, who can say. But I will say this, I still don’t think that any future console will ever cause the revolution that the original NES started. I would probably not be a gamer if it wasn’t for this big grey toaster.

Keep puffing on those carts.

About Me

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I’ve now made a few posts about the games that make me tick and why I find video games so appealing. This post is going to serve as a more formal introduction. First, let’s talk a bit about my moniker (and the name of this blog itself): Retro Sensei

“Retro” refers to my love of old school gaming. But of course I don’t limit myself, nor the content of this site to games of the past. I have a love of video games both old and new, but I do think it’s important for any gamer to “know their roots” so to speak. Not to mention, as a child of the 80’s and 90’s, I suffer from frequent bouts of nostalgia – all of which I plan to share with the readers of this blog.

The “Sensei” part? Well, this is a bit more complicated. As an older gamer who loves to share my passion for retro games, I suppose you could consider this blog my way of teaching these youngsters about the games of yesteryear. On top of that, I actually spent several years as a child living in the country of Japan. My time there, gave me a deep appreciation and love for Japanese culture. So… RetroSensei.

Originally, I ran this blog under the name of “8bitwizard”  (So yes, you’re reading an edited post).

I conceived the 8bit Wizard name a few years ago when posting on some old video game newsgroups back in the early days of the Internet. The name came to mind again when I decided to create a blog. I knew I wanted to make a blog with a strong focus on video games, but occasionally I like to ramble about other topics that interest me. Most of which are subjects that would also appeal to the geek-culture that seems to have blossomed with the advent of the Internet. In a nutshell, I decided it was time to change the name when I moved the blog to its own domain. Apparently, there’s a webcomic called 8-bit Wizard. (even if it only has one issue..)

Now, to get a bit personal. As I’ve said before, as of 2012, I’m a 33 year old adult, but I’m obviously still nothing more than a big kid who wears the skin of responsibility quite comfortably.  I was the only child in a military household. This means that every three years or so, my father would be reassigned to a different location and my family had to move. Moving so often makes it a bit difficult to make friends. Not only are you always confronted with new people, but there’s the whole social awkwardness of being in a strange place and not knowing how things work in a new school, etc. Often times, due to variances in education standards from state to state, you find yourself playing catch up or sometimes you’ll move to a new school and you’ll actually be further ahead and BORED TO DEATH!

I had a rough go of it as a kid. I was skinny, a bit awkward, and I usually talked different from everyone else. (Born in New England but lived in placed like Arkansas and Louisiana). I was always the “nerd” that everyone picked on. I was never good at sports, I had nothing in common with most of the other kids, you get the picture. So I retreated to safe confines of my bedroom where countless worlds awaited me thanks to both my large library of books and my NES.

I finally broke free of my nerd label as a teenager. I became interested in music and taught myself to play the guitar. Around the age of 14, I put away my games and focused my attention on starting a band. Playing rock music helped me build confidence to the point where I learned how to develop my social skills and overcame all the nonsense that plagued my early childhood. Over the years, I learned how to take care of myself and not to be pushed around. Regardless, I never forgot where I came from and I’ve made it a personal goal never to be like the bullies that once harassed me.

I got married in my early twenties and shortly after, my interest in video games returned. My wife and I bought a Playstation 2 and a Gamecube. I slowly started to rebuild my library and catch up on all the great games I missed over the years. That brings us to now. I worked a fulltime job, raise my family, and pursue a variety of interests. But my love of games remains.

As tempting as it is to claim that this is going to be a retro-gaming blog, I can’t really promise that. I’m also going to be talking about newer games. Actually, I’ll pretty much be posting about anything that interests me. Movies, comics, novels, whatever. Another large focus of this blog will probably be my video game interactions with my kids. My oldest son is eight, and his interest in games is at an all time high. If nothing else, I hope this site will make a nice bank of memories for them to look back on. But in the meantime, I hope anyone who stumbles across it has fun. If nothing else, this blog is a diary of sorts for whatever nerdy passion consumes me at the moment. Please feel free to participate and comment.

Retro Flashback: Super Mario Bros.

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As I mentioned in an earlier post, my love for gaming went mainstream on the Chrismas morning I unwrapped my first Nintendo Entertainment Sysem. I received two games that morning, Super Mario Bros. and Metroid.

Anyone who owned an NES in the 80s and 90s had a copy of Super Mario. It came with 90% of the systems. It was an instant ice breaker for kids my age. It didn’t matter who you were, you knew how to play SMB. You could sit down Indian-style next to a complete stranger and instantly begin bonding.

Everything about SMB was fascinating to a young kid such as myself. Chicken turtles, man-eating plants, smiling clouds, a plumber that can “spit” fireballs. It was just mind blowing at the time. There was nothing else like it.

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When I look back now, I can really appreciate just how much of a game-changer this title was. The wizards at Nintendo exhibited sheer genius. Not only in design, but also in marketing. I read once that sometime in the late 90s, a poll was conducted and it found that more children worldwide recognised Mario than recognised Mickey Mouse. I believe it. The marketing machine was in full swing as a result of it’s popularity: There were cartoons, breakfast cereals, toys, etc. Not only did this game spawn a plethora of sequels, but it has been re-released over and over. (I personally have bought this game no less than 5 times).

I have owned this title on the NES, I bought the enhanced remake (Super Mario All Stars) for the SNES, I purchased it again for the Gameboy Color, again on the Wii virtual console, and yet again, with the Wii Mario Anniversary edition. Nintendo got my money time and time again, all on one single game.

mario-all-stars-screen-5B1-5DSuper Mario All Stars Remake

 

When my oldest son approached me one morning at the age of four and said “Daddy, I think I would like try playing one of your video games now.” The first thing I grabbed for him was Super Mario.

Here’s to a classic title that has truly withstood the test of time. I plan to introduce a segment in the blog where I play through old classics and offer a “Rero Review”. I imagine that this title may be the first. Stay Tuned!

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A Night of Retro-Gaming

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After making my inital post, my curiosity was nudged a bit regarding the availability of old classic titles on modern systems. A while back I purchased the classic “Gauntlet” from the Xbox Live Arcade, so I knew that such titles were available. Interestingly enough, Gauntlet and other Midway titles seem to have been pulled from Xbox Live, but I did manage to find a few good classics for sale.

For only 400 points apiece, I snagged copies of both Asteroids/Asteroids Deluxe and Centipede/Millipede. The download comes with the titles both in their classic versions as well as new and enhanced graphics. However, aside from the visual changes, the games remain untouched.

It goes without saying that old coin-op style games are much more difficult than most modern day titles. This degree of difficulty was a big turn off for my eight-year-old son. Although, he did find the base simplicity of each game to be a bit appealing.

It’s a safe bet that these classics are not going get much playtime from him, the world of gaming has changed a great deal, and titles such as these are just not on the radar of most younger gamers these days. In reality, they are technically even “before my time”. But I must admit, there is still something magical about them. I was up until 2:00am playing Asteroids the other night, despite not making it past the third or fourth wave.

If you haven’t already guessed, I’m a sucker for nostalgia. I remember playing an arcade table Asteroids machine back during summer camp of my 3rd grade/4th grade year. Now, I could just find a similar version of Pitfall or Moon Patrol.